Should parents help children with homework?

Lib-40 (Large)The Director of Teaching and Learning at Bedales Prep School, Dunhurst, Andy Wiggins, is quoted extensively in an article on the subject of parental help with homework, published recently in The Telegraph. Is it best to let youngsters get on with it alone, asks the author, or should you sit on their shoulder, chipping in as necessary?

Andy observes that parents have a role to play – as the ‘warden’, providing subtle and not so subtle nudges, depending on the child, or as the ignorant questioner innocently probing for information to get the cogs of the brain whirring. However, he is adamant that parents must never be teacher. “That is what children go to school for”, he says. “Leave the teaching to us.” He explains that homework has three purposes – consolidating or extending the learning that has already taken place in class, giving learners the opportunity to explore or enhance their independence, and as an exercise in applying skills and mastering the discipline of managing workload and deadlines.

He explains: “There is a set limit to homework time, and if a child cannot complete their work in that time (give or take 10 minutes) then they should stop. I want to see an accurate reflection of the child’s work. If it is incomplete despite the best working conditions and optimal effort, then the failing is mine in the setting of the work.”

He concludes: “A parent over-teaching what the child supposedly knows in order to complete a homework task is a sign that the child has deep misunderstandings. As professionals, it is up to teachers to unpick this and explore new avenues for that learner – it is what we are trained to do, and the very core of our job.”

The full article can be read on the Telegraph website.

Telegraph | Andy Wiggins | Approach to learning at Dunhurst